Author: Anna Hess

Raise your hatch rates!

Are you thinking of leveling up this year, hatching your own eggs into a replacement flock? Then you’re in luck because my beloved incubation handbook is available in print for the very first time!

This is the same information that had previous readers glowing:

“I have had problems with incubating chicks, getting low to no hatch, and high hatch mortality. All of the info in this book makes great sense! This helped me a lot to fix ALL of my hatch problems.” — sunnyweller

“I especially found the “helping chicks hatch” section very helpful. Followed the instructions and saved two chicks!” — Keaokun

“My first attempt at incubating was a dismal failure. I only hatched 6 of 19 eggs. Two of those had facial and beak deformities. This little ebook was so helpful and I was able to pinpoint – many – things I had done wrong.” — V. Schafer

“Awesome book, well written. Not too basic nor too much extraneous detail.” — chem girl

Learn from my mistakes so you don’t have to repeat them. Grab your copy of Incubating and Hatching Homegrown Chicks today!

Build a DIY Chicken Waterer

Building a DIY Chicken WatererDo you want to build your own chicken waterer without wasting time on trial and error? Then look no further! We’ve expanded and cleaned up the instructions file that that used to come in our DIY kits and turned it into an ebook available on all retailers.

Get rid of those filthy waterers in your coops and tractors. Keep your flock hydrated in the winter when traditional waterers freeze. And give your flock something to do so they don’t pick on each other.

From easy-to-build bucket waterers to complex PVC arrays, you’ll save time and money while creating the perfect waterer for any type of poultry with our brand new ebook. Enjoy!

What kinds of table scraps are safe for chickens?

Food scraps for chickens

Did you know that grass and insects can make up about 20% of a chicken’s diet in the summer months? Unfortunately, cooped-up chickens don’t have access to that same scrumptious feast. But you can fill in the gaps with chicken scraps of nearly any sort.

Although some websites report that certain human foods are bad for chickens (notably dried beans, avocado stones and skins, green potatoes or tomatoes, and chocolate), I have my doubts that a non-starving chicken would even attempt to eat something hazardous. (Except possibly chocolate — but why are you throwing chocolate out?! Oh, and rotten meat — Harvey Ussery learned the hard way that dangling a corpse above the chicken coop in hopes maggots would drop in for free food wasn’t as clever as it seemed at first.)

The food scraps I actually consider hazardous in the chicken coop fit into an entirely different category. Anything high nutrient and tasty is likely to attract vermin (raccoons, opossums, rats) that will stick around and nibble on your eggs and/or flock. Specifically, I sincerely regretted giving fresh sweet-corn cobs to our flock because it jumpstarted a raccoon infestation that lingered for several months.

In the end, I recommend using your best judgement. If your flock has plenty of laying pellets around and the coop is tight enough to keep out critters, you might get away with tossing in anything at all.